Making Integrated Care Work

Contact Us: 202.684.7457

SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions

View Menu
Glossary
Facebook Twitter Listserve Ask a Question Email

When Adults Don’t Seek Help, Mental Health First Aid Can Help

When Adults Don’t Seek Help, Mental Health First Aid Can Help

Adults are reticent to discuss depression symptoms with primary care professionals, according to a recent study published in the Annals of Family Medicine — and interventions that encourage patients to talk to their physicians about depression are essential to prevention and early intervention efforts.

Mental Health First Aid supports the early recognition of signs and symptoms and connection to care.

Mental Health First Aid trains individuals to help a person developing or living with a behavioral health problem until appropriate treatment and supports are received. Many primary care professionals, including physicians, medical assistants, nurses, front desk staff and others, around the country have been trained in Mental Health First Aid already, and many more will be as CIHS offers more programs tailored to the primary care setting.

Mental Health First Aid addresses key periods in the development of behavioral health problems.

All people move along a continuum of health—from well to unwell and then to recovery—whether it relates to behavioral or general health. Different interventions are appropriate for each health state. Prevention and early intervention programs, such as Mental Health First Aid, target people at risk of, or in the early stages of developing, health problems. Many of these programs prevent problems from progressing into graver health states that can profoundly affect a person’s life (e.g., job loss, school failure, divorce, and addiction).

Unfortunately, Americans commonly experience a long delay between the onset of a behavioral problem and receiving treatment; the longer the delay, the more difficult recovery becomes. Primary care professionals are positioned to help people get the support they need during this time, and people are more inclined to seek specialty behavioral healthcare if their physician suggests it. If a person presents behavioral health signs and symptoms during a primary care visit, Mental Health First Aid improves identification and ensures appropriate intervention until a person receives specialty treatment.

For more information, visit www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org or connect via Facebook.

Call Our Helpline: 202-268-7457

When Adults Don’t Seek Help, Mental Health First Aid Can Help

Adults are reticent to discuss depression symptoms with primary care professionals, according to a recent study published in the Annals of Family Medicine — and interventions that encourage patients to talk to their physicians about depression are essential to prevention and early intervention efforts.

Mental Health First Aid supports the early recognition of signs and symptoms and connection to care.

Mental Health First Aid trains individuals to help a person developing or living with a behavioral health problem until appropriate treatment and supports are received. Many primary care professionals, including physicians, medical assistants, nurses, front desk staff and others, around the country have been trained in Mental Health First Aid already, and many more will be as CIHS offers more programs tailored to the primary care setting.

Mental Health First Aid addresses key periods in the development of behavioral health problems.

All people move along a continuum of health—from well to unwell and then to recovery—whether it relates to behavioral or general health. Different interventions are appropriate for each health state. Prevention and early intervention programs, such as Mental Health First Aid, target people at risk of, or in the early stages of developing, health problems. Many of these programs prevent problems from progressing into graver health states that can profoundly affect a person’s life (e.g., job loss, school failure, divorce, and addiction).

Unfortunately, Americans commonly experience a long delay between the onset of a behavioral problem and receiving treatment; the longer the delay, the more difficult recovery becomes. Primary care professionals are positioned to help people get the support they need during this time, and people are more inclined to seek specialty behavioral healthcare if their physician suggests it. If a person presents behavioral health signs and symptoms during a primary care visit, Mental Health First Aid improves identification and ensures appropriate intervention until a person receives specialty treatment.

For more information, visit www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org or connect via Facebook.

© 2011 NCBH, all rights reserved.
1400 K Street NW | Suite 400
Washington, D.C. 20005

Email: integration@thenationalcouncil.org

Phone: 202-684-7457