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Brief Interventions

SBIRT: Brief Intervention

Brief interventions are evidence-based practices design to motivate individuals at risk of substance abuse and related health problems to change their behavior by helping them understand how their substance use puts them at risk and to reduce or give up their substance use. Healthcare providers can also use brief interventions to encourage those with more serious dependence to accept more intensive treatment within the primary care setting or a referral to a specialized alcohol and drug treatment agency.

In primary care settings, brief interventions last from 5 minutes of brief advice to 15-30 minutes of brief counseling. Brief interventions are not intended to treat people with serious substance dependence, but rather to treat problematic or risky substance use. Skillfully conducted, brief interventions are essential to successful SBIRT implementation. The two most common behavioral therapies used in SBIRT programs are brief versions of cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational interviewing, or some combination of the two.  



BRIEF INTERNVENTION MODELS

Brief Negotiated Interview and Active Referral to Treatment: Provider Training Algorithm is a flowchart created by the Boston University School of Public Health that includes brief screening questions health practitioners can ask during brief intervention.

Brief Negotiated Interview (BNI) Steps includes a listing of questions and responses that a health provider can use by during a brief intervention.

The FLO Model includes providing feedback, listening and understanding, and exploring options.

The FRAMES Model involves feedback, responsibility, advice, menu of strategies, empathy, and self-efficacy.

GENERAL RESOURCES

Descriptions of Brief Intervention and Brief Therapy created by the Colorado Clinical Guidelines Collaborative details brief interventions and brief therapy.

The Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT) posts materials designed to facilitate the dissemination, adoption, and implementation of motivational interviewing among clinicians, supervisors, program managers, and trainers and improve treatment outcomes for people with substance use disorders. This site offers a wealth of useful tools related to motivational interviewing to help improve clinicians’ skills. For additional motivational interviewing information, review CIHS’ online motivational interviewing resources.

Brief Intervention: The ASSIST-Linked Brief Intervention for Hazardous and Harmful Substance Use: Manual for Use in Primary Care is a World Health Organization draft manual designed to explain the theoretical basis and evidence for brief intervention and to assist primary healthcare workers to conduct a simple brief intervention for risky or harmful drug use.

TIP 34 Brief Interventions and Brief Therapies for Substance Abuse is to education healthcare and social service providers on the research, results, and promise of brief interventions in the hope that they will broaden their use in clinical practice and treatment programs nationwide.

TIP 35 Enhancing Motivation for Change in Substance Abuse Treatment demonstrates how clinicians can influence the change process by developing a therapeutic relationship — one that respects and builds on the client's autonomy and, at the same time, makes the treatment counselor a participant in the change process — and describes different motivational interventions that can providers can use at all stages of change, from precontemplation and preparation to action and maintenance.

Brief Interventions and Brief Therapies for Substance Abuse describes brief intervention and brief therapy techniques for treatment of alcohol abuse and drug abuse, including brief cognitive-behavioral, strategic/ interactional, humanistic and existential, psychodynamic, family, and time-limited group therapies.

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SBIRT: Brief Intervention

Brief interventions are evidence-based practices design to motivate individuals at risk of substance abuse and related health problems to change their behavior by helping them understand how their substance use puts them at risk and to reduce or give up their substance use. Healthcare providers can also use brief interventions to encourage those with more serious dependence to accept more intensive treatment within the primary care setting or a referral to a specialized alcohol and drug treatment agency.

In primary care settings, brief interventions last from 5 minutes of brief advice to 15-30 minutes of brief counseling. Brief interventions are not intended to treat people with serious substance dependence, but rather to treat problematic or risky substance use. Skillfully conducted, brief interventions are essential to successful SBIRT implementation. The two most common behavioral therapies used in SBIRT programs are brief versions of cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational interviewing, or some combination of the two.  



BRIEF INTERNVENTION MODELS

Brief Negotiated Interview and Active Referral to Treatment: Provider Training Algorithm is a flowchart created by the Boston University School of Public Health that includes brief screening questions health practitioners can ask during brief intervention.

Brief Negotiated Interview (BNI) Steps includes a listing of questions and responses that a health provider can use by during a brief intervention.

The FLO Model includes providing feedback, listening and understanding, and exploring options.

The FRAMES Model involves feedback, responsibility, advice, menu of strategies, empathy, and self-efficacy.

GENERAL RESOURCES

Descriptions of Brief Intervention and Brief Therapy created by the Colorado Clinical Guidelines Collaborative details brief interventions and brief therapy.

The Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT) posts materials designed to facilitate the dissemination, adoption, and implementation of motivational interviewing among clinicians, supervisors, program managers, and trainers and improve treatment outcomes for people with substance use disorders. This site offers a wealth of useful tools related to motivational interviewing to help improve clinicians’ skills. For additional motivational interviewing information, review CIHS’ online motivational interviewing resources.

Brief Intervention: The ASSIST-Linked Brief Intervention for Hazardous and Harmful Substance Use: Manual for Use in Primary Care is a World Health Organization draft manual designed to explain the theoretical basis and evidence for brief intervention and to assist primary healthcare workers to conduct a simple brief intervention for risky or harmful drug use.

TIP 34 Brief Interventions and Brief Therapies for Substance Abuse is to education healthcare and social service providers on the research, results, and promise of brief interventions in the hope that they will broaden their use in clinical practice and treatment programs nationwide.

TIP 35 Enhancing Motivation for Change in Substance Abuse Treatment demonstrates how clinicians can influence the change process by developing a therapeutic relationship — one that respects and builds on the client's autonomy and, at the same time, makes the treatment counselor a participant in the change process — and describes different motivational interventions that can providers can use at all stages of change, from precontemplation and preparation to action and maintenance.

Brief Interventions and Brief Therapies for Substance Abuse describes brief intervention and brief therapy techniques for treatment of alcohol abuse and drug abuse, including brief cognitive-behavioral, strategic/ interactional, humanistic and existential, psychodynamic, family, and time-limited group therapies.

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