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Wellness Strategies

Wellness Strategies

The page includes links to a number of guides focused on wellness. These wellness strategies are organized into the following categories:


Nutrition


Physical activity and Weight Management 

  • The clinical practice guidelines for overweight and obesity management, released in concert by the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, and The Obesity Society update the 1998 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute "Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults." As the first official obesity guidelines to be released in 15 years, they outline a roadmap to empower clinicians and provide them with a framework to help their approach to obesity management.
     
  • Weight Management Strategies for Adults and Youth with Behavioral Health Conditions, created by the Behavioral Health & Wellness Program, this report focuses on the weight control issues seen in both adults and youth with behavioral health conditions (i.e., persons with mental illnesses and/or addictions).
     
  • Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans describe the types and amounts of physical activity that offer substantial health benefits to Americans. These are the first guidelines related to physical activity issued by the federal government. 
     
  • The Center for Disease Control reports, "Regular physical activity helps improve your overall health and fitness, and reduces your risk for many chronic diseases. Fitting regular exercise into your daily schedule may seem difficult at first, but the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans are more flexible than ever, giving you the freedom to reach your physical activity goals through different types and amounts of activities each week."
     
  • The National Center on Physical Activity and Disability shares  the latest information, resources, and research.
     
  • The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) is the Federal Government's lead agency for scientific research on the diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not generally considered part of conventional medicine. View the website and their evidence based information on complementary and alternative medicine.

Wellness Informed Care

Tools

  • The Collaborative Support Programs of New Jersey and the UIC Center on Psychiatric Disability and Co-Occurring Medical Conditions created Promoting Wellness for People in Mental Health Recovery: A Step-by-Step Guide to Planning and Conducting a Successful Health Fair, to help integrated care sites to reach people with screening, education, and support. Fairs help people learn about their health and support them in making healthy lifestyle choices. 
  • Supervisor Guide: Peer Support Whole Health and Wellness
    Developed by the Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network, this document contains information, resources, and strategies that supervisors and managers of community behavioral health agencies can use to successfully introduce the Peer Support
    Whole Health and Wellness service and the Wellness Coach role into their service delivery system. 
  • The Health Habits Screening, is a tool that primarily screens patients for potentially harmful drinking patterns, but includes additional questions on nutrition, smoking, and exercise behaviors and provides immediate, tailored feedback. It uses the World Health Organization’s (WHO) AUDIT screening tool and, like the AUDIT-C, if a patient does not have a positive score on the first few questions, it will not ask the rest of the questions in the full screen. Patients can print out the feedback sheet for themselves, as well as a one-page “Provider Report,” which patients can choose to share with their medical provider. 
     
  • The 126 Wellness Worksheets are designed to help individuals become more involved in their own wellness and better prepared to implement behavior change programs. They include the following types of activities:
    • Assessment tools that help individuals learn more about their wellness-related attitudes and behaviors.
    • Internet activities that guide the individual in finding and using wellness-related information on the Web.
    • Knowledge-based reviews that increase individuals’ comprehension of key concepts.
       
  • InShape is a wellness program for individuals with mental illness.The goal of In SHAPE is to improve physical health and quality of life, reduce the risk of preventable diseases, and enhance the life expectancy of individuals with serious mental illness. Studies show that individuals with severe and persistent mental illness such as schizophrenia and bi-polar disorder are at increased risk of chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, cardio-vascular disease, and nicotine dependence; and they have a lifespan that is 10-20 years shorter than the general population. In SHAPE participants work with a trained health mentor to create a Self Health Action Plan for Employment that includes physical activity, healthy eating goals, and attention to medical needs.
     
  • Wellness Self-Management is a curriculum-based clinical practice designed to help adults effectively manage serious mental health problems. WSM is based on Illness Management and Recovery (IMR), a nationally recognized evidence-based practice for adults with serious mental health problems. In addition to IMR-related topics such as recovery, mental health wellness, and relapse prevention, the WSM approach includes lessons emphasizing the connection between physical and mental health. It may be helpful to think of WSM as a comprehensive curriculum that covers many topics providing information, knowledge, and skills that help people to make decisions that support recovery. The curriculum is organized into a 57-lesson personal workbook.
  • The Nutrition and Exercise through Wellness and Recovery (NEW-R) Program discusses the importance of nutrition and physical activity.
     
  • The Patient Activation Measure™ (PAM™) survey assesses the knowledge, skills, and confidence integral to managing one's own health and healthcare. With the ability to measure activation and uncover related insights into consumer self-management abilities, care support and education can be more effectively tailored to help individuals become better self-managers. View a sample of this tool in a research study on its development. 
     
  • The Behavioral Health and Wellness Program offers training and consultation to healthcare providers, administrators, and clients. Over the last five years we have worked with over 20 states and have also provided services internationally.
     
  • Life Goals Collaborative Care (LGCC) is an evidence-based, consumer-centered program shown to improve health outcomes for persons with bipolar disorder in three separate randomized controlled trials. A central tenet of the program is reducing the separation between physical and mental health through integrated psychotherapy and collaborative care management. LGCC has been recently expanded to other chronic mental disorders (e.g., mood disorders), and found to be effective for those with co-occurring substance use and general medical disorders.
     
  • Prevention Means Business, a new infographic produced by the Public Health Institute in partnership with the American Public Health Association, graphically illustrates the connection between healthy places and thriving businesses.

Diabetes Management

  • The Center on Psychiatric Disability and Co-Occurring Medical Conditions Diabetes toolkit provides information to help clients with mental illness better understand their diabetes or pre-diabetes.
    • Care providers, family members, and other supporters will find it useful, too.
    • Download easy to understand patient education materials written at a 5th grade level.
    • All materials have been cross-walked with American Diabetes Association care standards.
       
  • Because cardiovascular disease is closely linked to diabetes, national guidelines recommend low-fat dietary advice for patients who have cardiovascular disease or are at risk for diabetes.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) study, Missed Opportunities for Providing Low-Fat Dietary Advice to People with Diabetes, examines the prevalence of sharing this information. 
     
  • The Association of Clinicians for the Underserved, ACU, has created educational materials on diabetes. These materials are available in both English and Spanish and include information on how to self- manage diabetes.
     
  • The American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes states "Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuing medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long term complications. A large body of evidence exist that supports a range of interventions to improve diabetes outcomes."
     
  • Diabetes self-management education/training is cost effective and improves health outcomes as patients maintain better control of their A1C. Physicians will benefit by establishing a relationship with a diabetes educator who can provide their services for patients with diabetes.
     
  • An article in INFORUM, Treating Mind and Body Integrating Mental Health and Primary Care Cuts Cost, speaks to the importance of integrating mental health and primary care when a patient at Stanford clinic was diagnosed with diabetes. The patient realized she turned to food as an unhealthy form of self-medication for depression, but over the course of her diabetes treatment, she felt strong enough to begin therapy for her depression.  In a normal primary care clinic, there is a 1 in 5 chance treatment will result in a decrease of depression symptoms. However, embedding mental health professionals in primary care settings has yielded far better results, decreasing symptoms by half. 

WEBINARS

Addressing Obesity and Chronic Illness among People with Mental Illnesses: What Works?
February 13, 2012
Presented by Stephen Bartels
Recording
Presentation
• Transcript

Peer Support Wellness Respite Centers
March 30, 2011
Presentation
• Contact CIHS if you need help accessing this information.

Call Our Helpline: 202-268-7457

Wellness Strategies

The page includes links to a number of guides focused on wellness. These wellness strategies are organized into the following categories:


Nutrition


Physical activity and Weight Management 

  • The clinical practice guidelines for overweight and obesity management, released in concert by the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, and The Obesity Society update the 1998 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute "Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults." As the first official obesity guidelines to be released in 15 years, they outline a roadmap to empower clinicians and provide them with a framework to help their approach to obesity management.
     
  • Weight Management Strategies for Adults and Youth with Behavioral Health Conditions, created by the Behavioral Health & Wellness Program, this report focuses on the weight control issues seen in both adults and youth with behavioral health conditions (i.e., persons with mental illnesses and/or addictions).
     
  • Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans describe the types and amounts of physical activity that offer substantial health benefits to Americans. These are the first guidelines related to physical activity issued by the federal government. 
     
  • The Center for Disease Control reports, "Regular physical activity helps improve your overall health and fitness, and reduces your risk for many chronic diseases. Fitting regular exercise into your daily schedule may seem difficult at first, but the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans are more flexible than ever, giving you the freedom to reach your physical activity goals through different types and amounts of activities each week."
     
  • The National Center on Physical Activity and Disability shares  the latest information, resources, and research.
     
  • The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) is the Federal Government's lead agency for scientific research on the diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not generally considered part of conventional medicine. View the website and their evidence based information on complementary and alternative medicine.

Wellness Informed Care

Tools

  • The Collaborative Support Programs of New Jersey and the UIC Center on Psychiatric Disability and Co-Occurring Medical Conditions created Promoting Wellness for People in Mental Health Recovery: A Step-by-Step Guide to Planning and Conducting a Successful Health Fair, to help integrated care sites to reach people with screening, education, and support. Fairs help people learn about their health and support them in making healthy lifestyle choices. 
  • Supervisor Guide: Peer Support Whole Health and Wellness
    Developed by the Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network, this document contains information, resources, and strategies that supervisors and managers of community behavioral health agencies can use to successfully introduce the Peer Support
    Whole Health and Wellness service and the Wellness Coach role into their service delivery system. 
  • The Health Habits Screening, is a tool that primarily screens patients for potentially harmful drinking patterns, but includes additional questions on nutrition, smoking, and exercise behaviors and provides immediate, tailored feedback. It uses the World Health Organization’s (WHO) AUDIT screening tool and, like the AUDIT-C, if a patient does not have a positive score on the first few questions, it will not ask the rest of the questions in the full screen. Patients can print out the feedback sheet for themselves, as well as a one-page “Provider Report,” which patients can choose to share with their medical provider. 
     
  • The 126 Wellness Worksheets are designed to help individuals become more involved in their own wellness and better prepared to implement behavior change programs. They include the following types of activities:
    • Assessment tools that help individuals learn more about their wellness-related attitudes and behaviors.
    • Internet activities that guide the individual in finding and using wellness-related information on the Web.
    • Knowledge-based reviews that increase individuals’ comprehension of key concepts.
       
  • InShape is a wellness program for individuals with mental illness.The goal of In SHAPE is to improve physical health and quality of life, reduce the risk of preventable diseases, and enhance the life expectancy of individuals with serious mental illness. Studies show that individuals with severe and persistent mental illness such as schizophrenia and bi-polar disorder are at increased risk of chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, cardio-vascular disease, and nicotine dependence; and they have a lifespan that is 10-20 years shorter than the general population. In SHAPE participants work with a trained health mentor to create a Self Health Action Plan for Employment that includes physical activity, healthy eating goals, and attention to medical needs.
     
  • Wellness Self-Management is a curriculum-based clinical practice designed to help adults effectively manage serious mental health problems. WSM is based on Illness Management and Recovery (IMR), a nationally recognized evidence-based practice for adults with serious mental health problems. In addition to IMR-related topics such as recovery, mental health wellness, and relapse prevention, the WSM approach includes lessons emphasizing the connection between physical and mental health. It may be helpful to think of WSM as a comprehensive curriculum that covers many topics providing information, knowledge, and skills that help people to make decisions that support recovery. The curriculum is organized into a 57-lesson personal workbook.
  • The Nutrition and Exercise through Wellness and Recovery (NEW-R) Program discusses the importance of nutrition and physical activity.
     
  • The Patient Activation Measure™ (PAM™) survey assesses the knowledge, skills, and confidence integral to managing one's own health and healthcare. With the ability to measure activation and uncover related insights into consumer self-management abilities, care support and education can be more effectively tailored to help individuals become better self-managers. View a sample of this tool in a research study on its development. 
     
  • The Behavioral Health and Wellness Program offers training and consultation to healthcare providers, administrators, and clients. Over the last five years we have worked with over 20 states and have also provided services internationally.
     
  • Life Goals Collaborative Care (LGCC) is an evidence-based, consumer-centered program shown to improve health outcomes for persons with bipolar disorder in three separate randomized controlled trials. A central tenet of the program is reducing the separation between physical and mental health through integrated psychotherapy and collaborative care management. LGCC has been recently expanded to other chronic mental disorders (e.g., mood disorders), and found to be effective for those with co-occurring substance use and general medical disorders.
     
  • Prevention Means Business, a new infographic produced by the Public Health Institute in partnership with the American Public Health Association, graphically illustrates the connection between healthy places and thriving businesses.

Diabetes Management

  • The Center on Psychiatric Disability and Co-Occurring Medical Conditions Diabetes toolkit provides information to help clients with mental illness better understand their diabetes or pre-diabetes.
    • Care providers, family members, and other supporters will find it useful, too.
    • Download easy to understand patient education materials written at a 5th grade level.
    • All materials have been cross-walked with American Diabetes Association care standards.
       
  • Because cardiovascular disease is closely linked to diabetes, national guidelines recommend low-fat dietary advice for patients who have cardiovascular disease or are at risk for diabetes.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) study, Missed Opportunities for Providing Low-Fat Dietary Advice to People with Diabetes, examines the prevalence of sharing this information. 
     
  • The Association of Clinicians for the Underserved, ACU, has created educational materials on diabetes. These materials are available in both English and Spanish and include information on how to self- manage diabetes.
     
  • The American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes states "Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuing medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long term complications. A large body of evidence exist that supports a range of interventions to improve diabetes outcomes."
     
  • Diabetes self-management education/training is cost effective and improves health outcomes as patients maintain better control of their A1C. Physicians will benefit by establishing a relationship with a diabetes educator who can provide their services for patients with diabetes.
     
  • An article in INFORUM, Treating Mind and Body Integrating Mental Health and Primary Care Cuts Cost, speaks to the importance of integrating mental health and primary care when a patient at Stanford clinic was diagnosed with diabetes. The patient realized she turned to food as an unhealthy form of self-medication for depression, but over the course of her diabetes treatment, she felt strong enough to begin therapy for her depression.  In a normal primary care clinic, there is a 1 in 5 chance treatment will result in a decrease of depression symptoms. However, embedding mental health professionals in primary care settings has yielded far better results, decreasing symptoms by half. 

WEBINARS

Addressing Obesity and Chronic Illness among People with Mental Illnesses: What Works?
February 13, 2012
Presented by Stephen Bartels
Recording
Presentation
• Transcript

Peer Support Wellness Respite Centers
March 30, 2011
Presentation
• Contact CIHS if you need help accessing this information.

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Email: integration@thenationalcouncil.org

Phone: 202-684-7457