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HRSA Supported HIV Providers

Integrating behavioral health into the HIV care continuum provides the opportunity to identify substance use and mental health concerns that may impact the health and wellbeing of people living with or at-risk for HIV. Understanding where to begin when integrating behavioral health can be a challenge. Providers may have questions about workforce development, business models, access to specialty treatment providers, policy and procedures, and reimbursement for the provision of behavioral health services. There are resources to help support you wherever you are in your journey toward integration.

The SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions (CIHS) compiled the following list of practice tools and resources that may support you as you begin your journey. These resources were selected based on four main categories that providers often request support in to enhance integration. In addition to this list, CIHS is available to provide tools and resources to support integration which may include web-based and telephonic consultations with CIHS staff and other experts. To learn more or for assistance finding exactly what you are looking for, contact our team at Integration@theNationalCouncil.org or 202-684-7457.

In addition to the resource list below, visit the TARGET Center, a one-stop shop for tapping into the full array of TA and training resources. Funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s HIV/AIDS Bureau, the TARGET Center offers a menu of options of support tools for providers and consumers including resources to enhance HIV/AIDS care, online and phone based support, webinars, and a calendar of training events.


HELPFUL TOOLS AND RESOURCES FOR INTEGRATING BEHAVIORAL HEALTH INTO HIV CARE

Quick Start Guide to Behavioral Health Integration: Provides an interactive flow chart with questions for your team to consider around the integration of behavioral health. This practical guide can be used for planning for integrated care; educating about the different levels of integrated care; establishing goals for moving through the continuum of integrated healthcare; and establishing a vision for integrated care.

The Case for Behavioral Health Screening in HIV Care Settings lays out the clear need for HIV treatment providers to jointly address behavioral health concerns and HIV, starting with screening for mental health and substance use disorders. This report from the SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions offers strategies for providers to implement screening practices, including tips for preparing staff, updating organizational culture and enhancing organizational infrastructure.

OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

Assessment Tools for Organizations Integrating Primary Care and Behavioral Health: As organizations embark on the road to integration, a great place to start is in measuring your organization’s readiness to integrate primary care and behavioral health. CIHS has compiled a menu of options of assessment tools to help organizations assess readiness to adopt integrated care. These tools can help organizational teams identify what gaps exist and what improvements are needed to achieve greater levels of integrated care in areas such as workforce development, clinical service enhancement, or refinements in health information technology.

The Commonwealth Fund: Assessing and Addressing Legal Barriers to the Clinical Integration of Community Health Centers and Other Community Providers: A report profiling health centers that have worked within the law to develop partnership that benefit patients, while still adhering to their health centers’ core mission to assure health care for all patients without insurance coverage. 

Health Information Technology: Important tools to help your team develop strategies to effectively and efficiently use electronic health records, conduct web-based screening, and safeguard privacy and confidentiality in integrated care settings. 

Health and Wellness: A vital component to health, wellness activities including nutrition, smoking cessation, physical activities and weight management, are essential to creating a comprehensive approach to care.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Core Competencies for Integrated Care: Provides organizations and individual professionals a “gold standard” for the skill set needed to deliver integrated care. These competencies can help organizations develop workforce training, inform job descriptions, and influence performance assessments.

Primary and Behavioral Health Integration: Guiding Principles for Workforce Development

Workforce issues including inadequate skills and training, management and supervision issues, and leadership concerns are often reported as barriers to the provision of integrated behavioral health and general healthcare. This guide provides recommended development strategies in training and education, recruitment and retention, leadership and other core areas to enhance workforce development.

Sample Job Descriptions: Integrated care requires a unique set of skills to function in a workflow that incorporates elements from both primary care and behavioral health care. An essential step to integrating behavioral health and primary care is recruitment and retention of high performers. Here you will find a list of resources including sample job descriptions and a performance assessment to ensure your team is successful in the recruitment and retention of providers.

CLINICAL TOOLS

Screening Tools for mental health and substance use:  Routine screening and early identification of substance use and mental health disorders is an important component to integrated care. Identifying symptoms earlier on the continuum in health care settings provides the opportunity to intervene earlier preventing more costly interventions down the line. Here you will find screening tools for depression, substance use, depression, trauma and other resources to help with integrating routine screening into care.

Resources on Motivational Interviewing: Supporting clients achieve healthy behavior change is often built into the fabric of care in integrated care settings. Motivational Interviewing is a clinical approach that helps people with mental health and substance use disorders and other chronic conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular conditions, and asthma make positive behavioral changes to support better health. The skills necessary to encourage behavior change through Motivational Interviewing – expressing empathy, developing discrepancy, rolling with resistance, and supporting self-efficacy, will help organizations achieve health outcomes with their clients.

SAMHSA’s Resources on Integrated Care: Whether in search of presentation, brochure, or fact sheet to share with your team, SAMHSA has available a library of resources on integrated care. These resources can be searched by profession, topic, and geographic location and touch on a variety of topic areas such as A Guide to Substance use Services for Primary Care Providers, presentation on the Prevalence of Behavioral Health Among People Living with HIV, and a Guide to Integrating Treatment to Co-Occurring Disorders.

Implementing Trauma Informed Care: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration:   What does it mean to be a trauma informed environment? Shifting the paradigm from one that asks, “what’s wrong with you” to one that asks, “what has happened to you” is central to the National Center on Trauma Informed Care’s (NCTIC) mission. NCTIC offers consultation and technical assistance, education and outreach, and resources to support a broad range of systems, including those providing mental health and substance use services, housing and homelessness services, HIV services, peer and family organizations, child welfare, criminal justice, and education.

SUSTAINABILITY

Billing and Reimbursement Tools: Maximizing revenue and sustaining integrated care approaches is critical in today’s healthcare environment. CIHS compiled individual state billing worksheets to help identify the available current procedural terminology (CPT) codes health care teams can use to bill for services related to integrated primary and behavioral health care.

The Business Case for Behavioral Healthcare: Provides guidance on developing the business case for integration of behavioral health and primary care.

Primary Care and Behavioral Health Integration Sustainability Checklist: Learn about key elements that are necessary for sustaining integration – factors such as building integration into policies and procedures, building leadership buy-in, creating efficient workflows, and identifying reimbursement for integrated care approaches.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Webinars: If you don’t find what you are looking for on this list, please visit our upcoming and previous webinars where we engage subject matter experts to present on key topic areas as Sustaining Behavioral Health Clinicians, Integrating Behavioral Health in Rural Primary Care, and Improving Transitions of Care to Reduce Hospital Readmissions.

eSolutions: A collection of electronic newsletters focused on news and perspectives on primary care and behavioral health integration. Sign up here to begin receiving your newsletter today!

Funding Opportunities: For information on funding opportunities, please visit Grants.gov

In addition to the resources listed above, CIHS has available a library of resources and tools covering a range of topics including substance usesuicide preventionpain management, andHealth Information Technology, and are available to help you find what you are looking for to achieve your goals. Please contact us at Integration@theNationalCouncil.org or 202-684-7457. 

Call Our Helpline: 202-268-7457

Integrating behavioral health into the HIV care continuum provides the opportunity to identify substance use and mental health concerns that may impact the health and wellbeing of people living with or at-risk for HIV. Understanding where to begin when integrating behavioral health can be a challenge. Providers may have questions about workforce development, business models, access to specialty treatment providers, policy and procedures, and reimbursement for the provision of behavioral health services. There are resources to help support you wherever you are in your journey toward integration.

The SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions (CIHS) compiled the following list of practice tools and resources that may support you as you begin your journey. These resources were selected based on four main categories that providers often request support in to enhance integration. In addition to this list, CIHS is available to provide tools and resources to support integration which may include web-based and telephonic consultations with CIHS staff and other experts. To learn more or for assistance finding exactly what you are looking for, contact our team at Integration@theNationalCouncil.org or 202-684-7457.

In addition to the resource list below, visit the TARGET Center, a one-stop shop for tapping into the full array of TA and training resources. Funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s HIV/AIDS Bureau, the TARGET Center offers a menu of options of support tools for providers and consumers including resources to enhance HIV/AIDS care, online and phone based support, webinars, and a calendar of training events.


HELPFUL TOOLS AND RESOURCES FOR INTEGRATING BEHAVIORAL HEALTH INTO HIV CARE

Quick Start Guide to Behavioral Health Integration: Provides an interactive flow chart with questions for your team to consider around the integration of behavioral health. This practical guide can be used for planning for integrated care; educating about the different levels of integrated care; establishing goals for moving through the continuum of integrated healthcare; and establishing a vision for integrated care.

The Case for Behavioral Health Screening in HIV Care Settings lays out the clear need for HIV treatment providers to jointly address behavioral health concerns and HIV, starting with screening for mental health and substance use disorders. This report from the SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions offers strategies for providers to implement screening practices, including tips for preparing staff, updating organizational culture and enhancing organizational infrastructure.

OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

Assessment Tools for Organizations Integrating Primary Care and Behavioral Health: As organizations embark on the road to integration, a great place to start is in measuring your organization’s readiness to integrate primary care and behavioral health. CIHS has compiled a menu of options of assessment tools to help organizations assess readiness to adopt integrated care. These tools can help organizational teams identify what gaps exist and what improvements are needed to achieve greater levels of integrated care in areas such as workforce development, clinical service enhancement, or refinements in health information technology.

The Commonwealth Fund: Assessing and Addressing Legal Barriers to the Clinical Integration of Community Health Centers and Other Community Providers: A report profiling health centers that have worked within the law to develop partnership that benefit patients, while still adhering to their health centers’ core mission to assure health care for all patients without insurance coverage. 

Health Information Technology: Important tools to help your team develop strategies to effectively and efficiently use electronic health records, conduct web-based screening, and safeguard privacy and confidentiality in integrated care settings. 

Health and Wellness: A vital component to health, wellness activities including nutrition, smoking cessation, physical activities and weight management, are essential to creating a comprehensive approach to care.

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

Core Competencies for Integrated Care: Provides organizations and individual professionals a “gold standard” for the skill set needed to deliver integrated care. These competencies can help organizations develop workforce training, inform job descriptions, and influence performance assessments.

Primary and Behavioral Health Integration: Guiding Principles for Workforce Development

Workforce issues including inadequate skills and training, management and supervision issues, and leadership concerns are often reported as barriers to the provision of integrated behavioral health and general healthcare. This guide provides recommended development strategies in training and education, recruitment and retention, leadership and other core areas to enhance workforce development.

Sample Job Descriptions: Integrated care requires a unique set of skills to function in a workflow that incorporates elements from both primary care and behavioral health care. An essential step to integrating behavioral health and primary care is recruitment and retention of high performers. Here you will find a list of resources including sample job descriptions and a performance assessment to ensure your team is successful in the recruitment and retention of providers.

CLINICAL TOOLS

Screening Tools for mental health and substance use:  Routine screening and early identification of substance use and mental health disorders is an important component to integrated care. Identifying symptoms earlier on the continuum in health care settings provides the opportunity to intervene earlier preventing more costly interventions down the line. Here you will find screening tools for depression, substance use, depression, trauma and other resources to help with integrating routine screening into care.

Resources on Motivational Interviewing: Supporting clients achieve healthy behavior change is often built into the fabric of care in integrated care settings. Motivational Interviewing is a clinical approach that helps people with mental health and substance use disorders and other chronic conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular conditions, and asthma make positive behavioral changes to support better health. The skills necessary to encourage behavior change through Motivational Interviewing – expressing empathy, developing discrepancy, rolling with resistance, and supporting self-efficacy, will help organizations achieve health outcomes with their clients.

SAMHSA’s Resources on Integrated Care: Whether in search of presentation, brochure, or fact sheet to share with your team, SAMHSA has available a library of resources on integrated care. These resources can be searched by profession, topic, and geographic location and touch on a variety of topic areas such as A Guide to Substance use Services for Primary Care Providers, presentation on the Prevalence of Behavioral Health Among People Living with HIV, and a Guide to Integrating Treatment to Co-Occurring Disorders.

Implementing Trauma Informed Care: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration:   What does it mean to be a trauma informed environment? Shifting the paradigm from one that asks, “what’s wrong with you” to one that asks, “what has happened to you” is central to the National Center on Trauma Informed Care’s (NCTIC) mission. NCTIC offers consultation and technical assistance, education and outreach, and resources to support a broad range of systems, including those providing mental health and substance use services, housing and homelessness services, HIV services, peer and family organizations, child welfare, criminal justice, and education.

SUSTAINABILITY

Billing and Reimbursement Tools: Maximizing revenue and sustaining integrated care approaches is critical in today’s healthcare environment. CIHS compiled individual state billing worksheets to help identify the available current procedural terminology (CPT) codes health care teams can use to bill for services related to integrated primary and behavioral health care.

The Business Case for Behavioral Healthcare: Provides guidance on developing the business case for integration of behavioral health and primary care.

Primary Care and Behavioral Health Integration Sustainability Checklist: Learn about key elements that are necessary for sustaining integration – factors such as building integration into policies and procedures, building leadership buy-in, creating efficient workflows, and identifying reimbursement for integrated care approaches.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Webinars: If you don’t find what you are looking for on this list, please visit our upcoming and previous webinars where we engage subject matter experts to present on key topic areas as Sustaining Behavioral Health Clinicians, Integrating Behavioral Health in Rural Primary Care, and Improving Transitions of Care to Reduce Hospital Readmissions.

eSolutions: A collection of electronic newsletters focused on news and perspectives on primary care and behavioral health integration. Sign up here to begin receiving your newsletter today!

Funding Opportunities: For information on funding opportunities, please visit Grants.gov

In addition to the resources listed above, CIHS has available a library of resources and tools covering a range of topics including substance usesuicide preventionpain management, andHealth Information Technology, and are available to help you find what you are looking for to achieve your goals. Please contact us at Integration@theNationalCouncil.org or 202-684-7457. 

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Phone: 202-684-7457