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Education & Training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a new model of care, integrated care requires revisions and additions to the traditional way in which healthcare providers are educated and trained to practice. This applies to all forms of clinical care, including family practice, primary care, and behavioral health. Providers need to refine some skills with minor adjustments, and they need to learn new interventions to assist in whole person healthcare. Initially this education has been “on the job training,” however, as integrated care models increase, educational systems will need to shift to adequately prepare an integrated workforce for the future. This includes graduate education programs teaching an integrated knowledge base and shifting the cultural expectations about clinical practice. Certificate programs and post-graduate training will be needed for professionals who want to adjust their skills mid-career. In addition, integrated care may always require a certain degree of onsite training as part of the team care development process. Similarly, patient education about the model and patient activation to engage in healthcare will be an ongoing core feature of successful integrated healthcare. 

If you think you have great resource or a good idea, we want to hear about it. Please email us your ideas and suggestions at integration@thenationalcouncil.org.

The core competencies emphasize the importance of specific skill acquisition by professionals to provide integrated care. Careful review of these nine competencies can assist organizations and individual professionals in identifying areas of needed education and training, and provide goals for the development of a better equipped workforce. 



Graduate Education

  • The Community College Consortia to Educate Health IT Professionals program funds community colleges to train mid-career healthcare or IT professionals on Health IT. The program aims to create a skilled workforce that can implement electronic healthcare systems and connects provider organizations with graduates to hire.
  • A variety of learning and training opportunities exist to help primary care, mental health, and addiction providers and others in the integrated health workforce learn more about integration and effective treatment interventions, including online learning opportunitiescertification programswebinars, and books.
  • The Social Worker Standard of Practice and Field Placement provides funding for 28 students to establish integrated care field placements to begin in fall 2013. Funding includes $10,000 per student with an allocation of $5,000 to the field placement site, $2,000 for the administrative costs at the graduate school, and a $3,000 scholarship for the student. An orientation webinar is also available on the website. 
  • The Doctor of Behavioral Health (DBH) from Arizona State University clinical track is focused on healthcare interventions and management. The management track focuses on on healthcare management for integrated behavioral health programs. 
     
  • The American Psychological Association's Directory of Doctoral Training Programs with Training Opportunities in Primary Care Psychology is a list of internship, postdoctoral, and doctoral training programs that offer training in primary care psychology. Information regarding internship and postdoctoral training programs were collected through the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers’ website and through the websites of each of the programs listed in the document.
     
  • The Graduate Psychology Education grant program funds schools to develop and operate training programs that prepare psychologists to work in an environment that integrates behavioral health in primary care.

Professional Certificates 

  • The Joint Commission's Integrated Care Certification program for Joint Commission-accredited hospitals, critical access hospitals and ambulatory health care providers is a voluntary certification that focuses on promoting and supporting clinically integrated patient care among hospitals and ambulatory health care providers.
  • The Behavioral Health and Integration Training Institute is a 40-hour continuing education training offered in a one-week format, targeted to current mental and behavioral health professionals interested in furthering their skill and knowledge base on integration and behavioral health. Participants are eligible to receive continuing education credits through Radford University. 
  • A Certificate Program in Primary Care Behavioral Health from the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Massachusetts Medical School offers licensed mental health professionals certification to work as primary care behavioral health providers.
  • The Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care from the University of Michigan - School of Social Work is designed for direct clinical practitioners -- social workers, nurses, care managers, psychologists, and physicians -- who deliver or plan to deliver integrated health services and who serve populations often presenting with complex needs in physical health, mental health, and substance use. 
  • The Addictions Certificate Program from the University of Michigan - School of Social Work is designed for direct clinical practitioners - social workers, nurses, and psychologists - who deliver or plan to deliver behavioral healthcare services to addicted populations that may present with additional complex and comorbid mental health and physical health needs.
  • The University of Washington - AIMS Center provides an online training for psychiatrists working in primary care. The training provides an introduction to practice in an integrated care team. This online training consists of five modules that describe the basic structure of an integrated care program for behavioral health in a primary care setting and provides information on the process of development and implementation of an integrated care team.
  • University of Maryland School of Medicine's Behavioral Health Integration in Pediatric Primary Care supports the efforts primary care providers (PCPs), including pediatricians, family physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants, in assessing and managing mental health concerns in their patients from infancy through the transition to young adulthood. 
  • The Certificate Program in Integrated Primary Care (CPIPC), offered by Fairleigh Dickinson University, reviews key principles of integrated primary care. Major program topics include basic concepts in integrated primary care, attributes of the care provider, practice standards, assessment, and program development.  

National Training Resources

  • The AHRQ Self-Management Support Resource Library includes a number trainings to help clinicians work with patients on how to make informed decisions about their own health care. 
     
  • The Addiction Transfer Technology Center Network (ATTC) is committed to providing professionals in the addictions treatment and recovery fields access to the highest level of professional development opportunities and training events. The ATTC network provides a host of on-line and self-paced training opportunities through healtheknowledge.org.
     
  • The California Healthcare Foundation's - patient-coaching techniques for clinicians provides useful 14-minute videos that demonstrates patient-coaching techniques that clinicians and community health workers or educators can use to collaborate with their patients. 
     
  • The Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention for Youth: A Practitioner’s Guide is designed to help health care professionals quickly identify youth at risk for alcohol-related problems. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) developed the guide in collaboration with the American Academy of Pediatrics, a team of underage drinking researchers and clinical specialists, and practicing health care professionals.
     
  • The AHRQ online library for safety net providers provides easy access to training activities that provide free, accredited continuing medical education and continuing education credits for healthcare professionals. 
     
  • The Case to Care Management Training expands the traditional case manager role from helping clients with serious mental illness establish a life in recovery to a broader role of assisting them to learn to manage chronic physical illness.
     
  • SAMHSA and HRSA identified and reviewed curricula that help behavioral health and primary care practitioners assess, treat, and refer lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) clients in a culturally sensitive manner. Six federally-supported LGBT culturally sensitive training curricula are available for Continuing Medical Education/Continuing Education Unit (CME/CEU) credit. SAMHSA and HRSA will continue to disseminate this information on their LGBT websites: LGBT Training Curricula (SAMHSA) and LGBT Health (HRSA).
     
  • The TeamSTEPPS® training module for primary care practices improves patient safety by teaching health care providers and staff how to communicate better, work more effectively, and make a greater commitment to teamwork. TeamSTEPPS is an evidence-based learning approach jointly developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Department of Defense (DoD).
  • The Social Worker Standard of Practice and Field Placement provides funding for 28 students to establish integrated care field placements to begin in fall 2013. The Integrated Healthcare Curriculum for Schools of Social Works is a competency-based curriculum to prepare Masters of Social Work students for behavioral health practice focused on integrative and collaborative primary-behavioral healthcare. 
  • CIHS, in collaboration with the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) Network and the Morehouse School of Medicine National Center for Primary Care, developed a 5-hour self-paced online course for addiction treatment professionals considering career opportunities in primary care. The course provides these professionals with resources and information to help them decide whether working in a primary care setting is right for them.
     
  • The Whole Health Action Management (WHAM) program creates workforce capacity by preparing consumers to serve as health educators and coaches. The curriculum guides participants through a person-centered planning process to set a whole health and resiliency goal and implementing a weekly action plan for success. The training is designed to support the emerging peer workforce to move into new health integration service models like health homes.
  • Mental Health First Aid creates capacity within the public to identify, understand, and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders. It introduces participants to risk factors and warning signs of mental health problems and substance use disorders, builds understanding of their impact, and overviews common treatments. CIHS supported the development of Mental Health First Aid tools designed for application in rural communities. CIHS also supported a Spanish translation and cultural adaptation of the curriculum to address the needs of diverse communities across the country. 
  • The Substance Use in Adults and Adolescents: Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) free online SBIRT course through Medscape, aims to address the basic principles of SBIRT as well as coding and reimbursement for the implementation of SBIRT in practice.
    ** A free membership to Medscape is required to view the training.

Onsite Training Components 

SHADOWING

  • The Alberta Health Services - Interprofessional Mentoring Guide for Supervisors, Staff, and Students was developed for healthcare practitioners and students to support interprofessional practice education for students at the workplace setting. It is vital that healthcare training integrate intentional education strategies to promote collaborative practice between providers and students from different disciplines.

  • The Mental Health Partners shadowing tool developed by Clare Scott, LCSW prepares individuals to meet the following expectations: increase system expertise, increase knowledge of clinic work flow, and demonstrate how to join a team, through building trust, and effective communication with medical providers and clinic staff.

SHARED TEAM TRAINING

  • The Suicide Prevention Toolkit for Rural Primary Care is a web-based toolkit that contains information on how to implement state-of-the art suicide prevention practices and overcome the significant hurdles this life-saving work faces in primary care practices. The tools will help providers assess patients’ risk of suicide, plan interventions, and create safety plans. The toolkit is a collaborative project of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) and the Western Interstate Commission of Higher Education (WICHE), Mental Health Program. Although the tools are designed with the rural practice in mind, most are quite suitable for use in non-rural settings as well.
     
  • Rural Mental Health First Aid is a way to build community level capacity to identify mental health and substance abuse issues early and for rural residents to increase their confidence to intervene and refer people to the resources that do exist.

TECHNOLOGY SPECIFIC TRAINING


Patient Education of Model of Care 

  • The Partners in Health Toolkit was developed – partially written and partially compiled – by Barbara Demming Lurie of the Integrated Behavioral Health Project (IBHP) and sponsored by the California Mental Health Services Authority’s (CalMHSA) Statewide Stigma and Discrimination Reduction Initiative. It includes several sections relevant to the patient education model of care.
    -Introducing the Care Management Team to the Clients (pg. 75)
    - Informing patients of their rights regarding sharing of information between agencies (pg. 102)
    - Patient information sheet explaining electronic information-sharing (pg. 110)
    - Sample Patient consent for electronic information sharing (pg. 113)
     
  • The involvement of family members is essential to integrated care. Family members can activate self-management strategies to promote health and longevity.

Cultural Competence and Adaptation

Call Our Helpline: 202-268-7457

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a new model of care, integrated care requires revisions and additions to the traditional way in which healthcare providers are educated and trained to practice. This applies to all forms of clinical care, including family practice, primary care, and behavioral health. Providers need to refine some skills with minor adjustments, and they need to learn new interventions to assist in whole person healthcare. Initially this education has been “on the job training,” however, as integrated care models increase, educational systems will need to shift to adequately prepare an integrated workforce for the future. This includes graduate education programs teaching an integrated knowledge base and shifting the cultural expectations about clinical practice. Certificate programs and post-graduate training will be needed for professionals who want to adjust their skills mid-career. In addition, integrated care may always require a certain degree of onsite training as part of the team care development process. Similarly, patient education about the model and patient activation to engage in healthcare will be an ongoing core feature of successful integrated healthcare. 

If you think you have great resource or a good idea, we want to hear about it. Please email us your ideas and suggestions at integration@thenationalcouncil.org.

The core competencies emphasize the importance of specific skill acquisition by professionals to provide integrated care. Careful review of these nine competencies can assist organizations and individual professionals in identifying areas of needed education and training, and provide goals for the development of a better equipped workforce. 



Graduate Education

  • The Community College Consortia to Educate Health IT Professionals program funds community colleges to train mid-career healthcare or IT professionals on Health IT. The program aims to create a skilled workforce that can implement electronic healthcare systems and connects provider organizations with graduates to hire.
  • A variety of learning and training opportunities exist to help primary care, mental health, and addiction providers and others in the integrated health workforce learn more about integration and effective treatment interventions, including online learning opportunitiescertification programswebinars, and books.
  • The Social Worker Standard of Practice and Field Placement provides funding for 28 students to establish integrated care field placements to begin in fall 2013. Funding includes $10,000 per student with an allocation of $5,000 to the field placement site, $2,000 for the administrative costs at the graduate school, and a $3,000 scholarship for the student. An orientation webinar is also available on the website. 
  • The Doctor of Behavioral Health (DBH) from Arizona State University clinical track is focused on healthcare interventions and management. The management track focuses on on healthcare management for integrated behavioral health programs. 
     
  • The American Psychological Association's Directory of Doctoral Training Programs with Training Opportunities in Primary Care Psychology is a list of internship, postdoctoral, and doctoral training programs that offer training in primary care psychology. Information regarding internship and postdoctoral training programs were collected through the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers’ website and through the websites of each of the programs listed in the document.
     
  • The Graduate Psychology Education grant program funds schools to develop and operate training programs that prepare psychologists to work in an environment that integrates behavioral health in primary care.

Professional Certificates 

  • The Joint Commission's Integrated Care Certification program for Joint Commission-accredited hospitals, critical access hospitals and ambulatory health care providers is a voluntary certification that focuses on promoting and supporting clinically integrated patient care among hospitals and ambulatory health care providers.
  • The Behavioral Health and Integration Training Institute is a 40-hour continuing education training offered in a one-week format, targeted to current mental and behavioral health professionals interested in furthering their skill and knowledge base on integration and behavioral health. Participants are eligible to receive continuing education credits through Radford University. 
  • A Certificate Program in Primary Care Behavioral Health from the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Massachusetts Medical School offers licensed mental health professionals certification to work as primary care behavioral health providers.
  • The Certificate in Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care from the University of Michigan - School of Social Work is designed for direct clinical practitioners -- social workers, nurses, care managers, psychologists, and physicians -- who deliver or plan to deliver integrated health services and who serve populations often presenting with complex needs in physical health, mental health, and substance use. 
  • The Addictions Certificate Program from the University of Michigan - School of Social Work is designed for direct clinical practitioners - social workers, nurses, and psychologists - who deliver or plan to deliver behavioral healthcare services to addicted populations that may present with additional complex and comorbid mental health and physical health needs.
  • The University of Washington - AIMS Center provides an online training for psychiatrists working in primary care. The training provides an introduction to practice in an integrated care team. This online training consists of five modules that describe the basic structure of an integrated care program for behavioral health in a primary care setting and provides information on the process of development and implementation of an integrated care team.
  • University of Maryland School of Medicine's Behavioral Health Integration in Pediatric Primary Care supports the efforts primary care providers (PCPs), including pediatricians, family physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants, in assessing and managing mental health concerns in their patients from infancy through the transition to young adulthood. 
  • The Certificate Program in Integrated Primary Care (CPIPC), offered by Fairleigh Dickinson University, reviews key principles of integrated primary care. Major program topics include basic concepts in integrated primary care, attributes of the care provider, practice standards, assessment, and program development.  

National Training Resources

  • The AHRQ Self-Management Support Resource Library includes a number trainings to help clinicians work with patients on how to make informed decisions about their own health care. 
     
  • The Addiction Transfer Technology Center Network (ATTC) is committed to providing professionals in the addictions treatment and recovery fields access to the highest level of professional development opportunities and training events. The ATTC network provides a host of on-line and self-paced training opportunities through healtheknowledge.org.
     
  • The California Healthcare Foundation's - patient-coaching techniques for clinicians provides useful 14-minute videos that demonstrates patient-coaching techniques that clinicians and community health workers or educators can use to collaborate with their patients. 
     
  • The Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention for Youth: A Practitioner’s Guide is designed to help health care professionals quickly identify youth at risk for alcohol-related problems. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) developed the guide in collaboration with the American Academy of Pediatrics, a team of underage drinking researchers and clinical specialists, and practicing health care professionals.
     
  • The AHRQ online library for safety net providers provides easy access to training activities that provide free, accredited continuing medical education and continuing education credits for healthcare professionals. 
     
  • The Case to Care Management Training expands the traditional case manager role from helping clients with serious mental illness establish a life in recovery to a broader role of assisting them to learn to manage chronic physical illness.
     
  • SAMHSA and HRSA identified and reviewed curricula that help behavioral health and primary care practitioners assess, treat, and refer lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) clients in a culturally sensitive manner. Six federally-supported LGBT culturally sensitive training curricula are available for Continuing Medical Education/Continuing Education Unit (CME/CEU) credit. SAMHSA and HRSA will continue to disseminate this information on their LGBT websites: LGBT Training Curricula (SAMHSA) and LGBT Health (HRSA).
     
  • The TeamSTEPPS® training module for primary care practices improves patient safety by teaching health care providers and staff how to communicate better, work more effectively, and make a greater commitment to teamwork. TeamSTEPPS is an evidence-based learning approach jointly developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Department of Defense (DoD).
  • The Social Worker Standard of Practice and Field Placement provides funding for 28 students to establish integrated care field placements to begin in fall 2013. The Integrated Healthcare Curriculum for Schools of Social Works is a competency-based curriculum to prepare Masters of Social Work students for behavioral health practice focused on integrative and collaborative primary-behavioral healthcare. 
  • CIHS, in collaboration with the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) Network and the Morehouse School of Medicine National Center for Primary Care, developed a 5-hour self-paced online course for addiction treatment professionals considering career opportunities in primary care. The course provides these professionals with resources and information to help them decide whether working in a primary care setting is right for them.
     
  • The Whole Health Action Management (WHAM) program creates workforce capacity by preparing consumers to serve as health educators and coaches. The curriculum guides participants through a person-centered planning process to set a whole health and resiliency goal and implementing a weekly action plan for success. The training is designed to support the emerging peer workforce to move into new health integration service models like health homes.
  • Mental Health First Aid creates capacity within the public to identify, understand, and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders. It introduces participants to risk factors and warning signs of mental health problems and substance use disorders, builds understanding of their impact, and overviews common treatments. CIHS supported the development of Mental Health First Aid tools designed for application in rural communities. CIHS also supported a Spanish translation and cultural adaptation of the curriculum to address the needs of diverse communities across the country. 
  • The Substance Use in Adults and Adolescents: Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) free online SBIRT course through Medscape, aims to address the basic principles of SBIRT as well as coding and reimbursement for the implementation of SBIRT in practice.
    ** A free membership to Medscape is required to view the training.

Onsite Training Components 

SHADOWING

  • The Alberta Health Services - Interprofessional Mentoring Guide for Supervisors, Staff, and Students was developed for healthcare practitioners and students to support interprofessional practice education for students at the workplace setting. It is vital that healthcare training integrate intentional education strategies to promote collaborative practice between providers and students from different disciplines.

  • The Mental Health Partners shadowing tool developed by Clare Scott, LCSW prepares individuals to meet the following expectations: increase system expertise, increase knowledge of clinic work flow, and demonstrate how to join a team, through building trust, and effective communication with medical providers and clinic staff.

SHARED TEAM TRAINING

  • The Suicide Prevention Toolkit for Rural Primary Care is a web-based toolkit that contains information on how to implement state-of-the art suicide prevention practices and overcome the significant hurdles this life-saving work faces in primary care practices. The tools will help providers assess patients’ risk of suicide, plan interventions, and create safety plans. The toolkit is a collaborative project of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) and the Western Interstate Commission of Higher Education (WICHE), Mental Health Program. Although the tools are designed with the rural practice in mind, most are quite suitable for use in non-rural settings as well.
     
  • Rural Mental Health First Aid is a way to build community level capacity to identify mental health and substance abuse issues early and for rural residents to increase their confidence to intervene and refer people to the resources that do exist.

TECHNOLOGY SPECIFIC TRAINING


Patient Education of Model of Care 

  • The Partners in Health Toolkit was developed – partially written and partially compiled – by Barbara Demming Lurie of the Integrated Behavioral Health Project (IBHP) and sponsored by the California Mental Health Services Authority’s (CalMHSA) Statewide Stigma and Discrimination Reduction Initiative. It includes several sections relevant to the patient education model of care.
    -Introducing the Care Management Team to the Clients (pg. 75)
    - Informing patients of their rights regarding sharing of information between agencies (pg. 102)
    - Patient information sheet explaining electronic information-sharing (pg. 110)
    - Sample Patient consent for electronic information sharing (pg. 113)
     
  • The involvement of family members is essential to integrated care. Family members can activate self-management strategies to promote health and longevity.

Cultural Competence and Adaptation

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Email: integration@thenationalcouncil.org

Phone: 202-684-7457