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Partnerships

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because integrated care is founded on the idea of various disciplines working together towards a shared goal, it requires hiring numerous types of providers. Often organizations initiating integrated care are hiring disciplines that they may have no experience with in the past, and may not have specific funding to employ. Partnerships that share providers between organizations allow for expansion to integrated care and the ability to maximize community resources to treat the whole person. The workforce implications of partnerships are both exciting and at times challenging with organizational contrasts in hiring practices, employee expectations and compliance concerns, and funding for positions. 

If you think you have great resource or a good idea, we want to hear about it. Please email us your ideas and suggestions at integration@thenationalcouncil.org.

The core competencies describe the ideal provider skill set for integrated care. As organizations look at partnerships to provide integrated care, many of these competencies (such as interpersonal communication, collaboration and team work, and care planning and care coordination) become even more important. Careful review of the competencies may assist partners in developing the structure of their shared work as well as the competencies needed by shared employees. 


  • CIHS' eSolutions article Integration Partnerships – A Love Story details a love story between primary care and behavioral health. We hope you’ll come away with plans for your own marriage, knowing that CIHS is always available to add fuel to your flame.
  • The Shared Care Plan is a free, easy-to-use, record that lets you organize and store vital health information. This information can be shared with family, physicians and others you feel should have access to this information. It is also a self-management care plan, which improves understanding of your own health. A sample care plan can be viewed in English or Spanish.
  • The Partners in Health Toolkit was developed – partially written and partially compiled – by Barbara Demming Lurie of the Integrated Behavioral Health Project (IBHP) and sponsored by the California Mental Health Services Authority’s (CalMHSA) Statewide Stigma and Discrimination Reduction Initiative.  It includes several sections relevant to partnerships, including: 

    - Issues Worth Considering in Forging Partnerships (pg. 32)
    - The Partnership Model (pg. 50)
    - Shaking Hands: Interagency Agreements (pg. 157)
    - Sample HIPAA Provisions Agreement (pg. 105)
  • Navigating Primary Care - Behavioral Health Provider Relationship shares tips and resources needed to maintain a healthy primary care-behavioral health partnership. It provides insights into why this relationship is vital to your integration efforts and the dangers of failing to prioritize it. 
     
  • Working with Federally Qualified Health Centers provides an introduction to FQHC partnerships and key concepts that community mental health centers should know about. Topics that are reviewed in the presentation include cost-based reimbursement, BH expansion grants, and scope of service.
     
  • Creating Academic Partnerships: Clinical and Workforce Benefits takes a look at how one SAMHSA PBHCI grantee is developing successful partnerships between an integrated care program and academic centers.This presentation shares the partnership between nursing students from Rush University who have been integrated into Trilogy’s Integrated Health Program, with opportunities for the inter-professional experiences deemed so important to the future workforce. 
     
  • The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)  promotes collaborative mental health partnerships between child adolescen psychiatrists (CAPs) and primary care clinicians (PCCs).  The Guide to Building Collaborative Mental Health Care Partnerships in Pediatric Primary Care is designed to help CAPs in understanding, building, and implementing collaborative mental health care partnerships in the primary care setting.
     
  • As community-based primary  and behavioral health care providers come together to better meet patient needs by integrating services and sharing staff, there are practical considerations such as contracting and partnership agreements that will help community health organizations transform from clinical models of integration into truly integrated practices. CIHS regularly shares useful resources for community providers to draw upon when entering supportive relationships.
     
  • CIHS’ Standard Framework for Levels of Integrated Healthcare helps primary and behavioral healthcare provider organizations improve outcomes by helping them understand where they are on the integration continuum. This six-level framework can be used for planning; creating a common language to discuss integration, progress, and financing; supporting assessment and benchmarking efforts; explaining integration efforts to stakeholders; and clarifying differences in vision between two or more partnering organizations.

Call Our Helpline: 202-268-7457

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because integrated care is founded on the idea of various disciplines working together towards a shared goal, it requires hiring numerous types of providers. Often organizations initiating integrated care are hiring disciplines that they may have no experience with in the past, and may not have specific funding to employ. Partnerships that share providers between organizations allow for expansion to integrated care and the ability to maximize community resources to treat the whole person. The workforce implications of partnerships are both exciting and at times challenging with organizational contrasts in hiring practices, employee expectations and compliance concerns, and funding for positions. 

If you think you have great resource or a good idea, we want to hear about it. Please email us your ideas and suggestions at integration@thenationalcouncil.org.

The core competencies describe the ideal provider skill set for integrated care. As organizations look at partnerships to provide integrated care, many of these competencies (such as interpersonal communication, collaboration and team work, and care planning and care coordination) become even more important. Careful review of the competencies may assist partners in developing the structure of their shared work as well as the competencies needed by shared employees. 


  • CIHS' eSolutions article Integration Partnerships – A Love Story details a love story between primary care and behavioral health. We hope you’ll come away with plans for your own marriage, knowing that CIHS is always available to add fuel to your flame.
  • The Shared Care Plan is a free, easy-to-use, record that lets you organize and store vital health information. This information can be shared with family, physicians and others you feel should have access to this information. It is also a self-management care plan, which improves understanding of your own health. A sample care plan can be viewed in English or Spanish.
  • The Partners in Health Toolkit was developed – partially written and partially compiled – by Barbara Demming Lurie of the Integrated Behavioral Health Project (IBHP) and sponsored by the California Mental Health Services Authority’s (CalMHSA) Statewide Stigma and Discrimination Reduction Initiative.  It includes several sections relevant to partnerships, including: 

    - Issues Worth Considering in Forging Partnerships (pg. 32)
    - The Partnership Model (pg. 50)
    - Shaking Hands: Interagency Agreements (pg. 157)
    - Sample HIPAA Provisions Agreement (pg. 105)
  • Navigating Primary Care - Behavioral Health Provider Relationship shares tips and resources needed to maintain a healthy primary care-behavioral health partnership. It provides insights into why this relationship is vital to your integration efforts and the dangers of failing to prioritize it. 
     
  • Working with Federally Qualified Health Centers provides an introduction to FQHC partnerships and key concepts that community mental health centers should know about. Topics that are reviewed in the presentation include cost-based reimbursement, BH expansion grants, and scope of service.
     
  • Creating Academic Partnerships: Clinical and Workforce Benefits takes a look at how one SAMHSA PBHCI grantee is developing successful partnerships between an integrated care program and academic centers.This presentation shares the partnership between nursing students from Rush University who have been integrated into Trilogy’s Integrated Health Program, with opportunities for the inter-professional experiences deemed so important to the future workforce. 
     
  • The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)  promotes collaborative mental health partnerships between child adolescen psychiatrists (CAPs) and primary care clinicians (PCCs).  The Guide to Building Collaborative Mental Health Care Partnerships in Pediatric Primary Care is designed to help CAPs in understanding, building, and implementing collaborative mental health care partnerships in the primary care setting.
     
  • As community-based primary  and behavioral health care providers come together to better meet patient needs by integrating services and sharing staff, there are practical considerations such as contracting and partnership agreements that will help community health organizations transform from clinical models of integration into truly integrated practices. CIHS regularly shares useful resources for community providers to draw upon when entering supportive relationships.
     
  • CIHS’ Standard Framework for Levels of Integrated Healthcare helps primary and behavioral healthcare provider organizations improve outcomes by helping them understand where they are on the integration continuum. This six-level framework can be used for planning; creating a common language to discuss integration, progress, and financing; supporting assessment and benchmarking efforts; explaining integration efforts to stakeholders; and clarifying differences in vision between two or more partnering organizations.

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Email: integration@thenationalcouncil.org

Phone: 202-684-7457