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Health Indicator Data

eSolutions: Health Indicator Data

Feature Article: Health Data: The Key to Improve Health Outcomes
Grantee Profile:
Washtenaw Community Health Organization
Quick Tips:
Collecting and Monitoring Health Data to Improve Outcomes
Featured Resource
CIHS Webinars
Hot Topics

Health Data: The Key to Improved Health Outcomes

Jennifer Crawford, Deputy Director, JD, LCSW-C, SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions and former PBHCI grant project director

Most professionals working in primary and behavioral health integration know that adults with serious mental illness die earlier than the general population because of chronic health conditions such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular diseases. In addition to early mortality, these adults incur significantly higher healthcare costs. One cost analysis found that average costs were $650 higher per month for individuals with co-occurring behavioral health and chronic health conditions than they were for people without these co-occurring conditions. Most of these illnesses can be managed by actively monitoring clients, as well as educating and encouraging them to make positive lifestyle changes. 

Both behavioral health and primary care providers are increasingly taking up this responsibility, working to address clients’ whole health by developing systems to track health data and demonstrate improved outcomes over time. Since 2009, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has awarded multi-year grants to 93 community behavioral health organizations to integrate primary care into their behavioral health settings. These Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI) grants support systems change and help improve the physical health status of individuals with serious mental illnesses and co-occurring chronic illnesses, as well as support the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ “triple aim” of improving the health outcomes; enhancing the individual’s experience of care — including improving quality, access, and reliability of services; and controlling per capita healthcare cost.

To inform efforts to improve the health status of those they serve, these PBHCI grantees collect health data in intervals of 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The table below summarizes the health data collected by PBHCI grantees.

Data Collected

Frequency of Collection

Rationale

Lipids (Triglycerides, LDL, HDL)
Annually
Monitor cardiovascular risks
Fasting Glucose
Annually
Monitor glucose abnormalities in fasting consumers
 
Evidence suggests that diabetes in people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and schizoaffective disorder is 2-3 times higher than that of the general population. 
HgbA1c
Annually
Monitor glucose abnormalities in non-fasting consumers
 
Fasting glucose can be difficult to obtain.
Height & Weight (yields Body Mass Index(BMI))
Every 3 months
Monitor weight to prevent and address obesity and associated health issues such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
 
People with serious mental Illness have higher rates of obesity and some psychotropic drugs have been documented to cause weight gain. Obesity has been linked to higher rates of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
Waist Circumference
Every 3 months
Monitor weight to prevent and address obesity and associated health issues such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
 
Waist Circumference measurement may be more accurate than BMI to assess for possible cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance.
Breath Carbon Monoxide (CO)
Every 3 months
Monitors CO readings, which correlates to how much a consumer has smoked recently.
Tobacco Use (self-report)
Every 6 months
Monitor tobacco use
 
Evidence suggests that 50-80% of people with major depression, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia smoke and are at significantly higher risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than the general population. Smoking cessation is associated with a roughly 50% decrease in the risk of coronary heart disease.
Blood Pressure (Systolic and Diastolic)
Every 3 months
Monitor or treat hypertension with dietary changes or medication

Behavioral health and primary care professionals apply this health data in a variety of ways. They use it to:

  •  Educate and activate the individuals they serve to stop or taper smoking, increase physical activity, lose weight, reduce and prevent high blood pressure, lower cholesterol, and keep appointments with health providers. 
    Celebrate successes with the individuals they serve.
  • Continuously monitor and address health risks through integrated behavioral health and primary care treatment plans.
  • Coordinate care with primary care providers, therapists, case managers, and psychiatrists.
  • Identify health disparities to inform development of cultural competent services, supports, and information.
  • Create staff- or peer-led wellness programs to address individuals’ complex health needs.
  • Encourage those they serve to participate in wellness activities to reduce a particular health risk. For example, if a person has high blood pressure, staff will encourage him or her to engage in a blood pressure wellness group to learn how to lower their blood pressure. After participation, staff reviews the data again and modifies treatment plans accordingly.
  • Populate analytic tools such as health registries and electronic health record reports. By using registries, behavioral health professionals have been able to shift from focusing only on individual interventions to a population health management approach. Understanding the specific health risks of subsets of individuals by chronic illness or health disparities groups based on race, gender, or age can help providers target limited budgets and staff resources and maximize health outcomes for consumers.

As primary care settings provide more behavioral health services, primary care providers, who have long tracked health outcomes, now also track behavioral health progress.  A frequently used assessment tool in primary care settings is the nine item depression scale called the PHQ-9. This free tool, available in many languages, rates an individual’s level of depression and informs the professional whether the person’s symptoms are responding to treatment. In primary care settings providing “stepped care,” groups of patients are offered medication, brief counseling, and referral to a behavioral health professional or relapse prevention support based on their depression screening scores. Individuals are routinely assessed and monitored to ensure that progress is made. 

Monitoring health data should be a dynamic process that prompts changes in treatment strategies if results are not achieved.  Even small reductions in risk factors can achieve significant reductions in coronary heart diseaseFor example, a 10% reduction in cholesterol levels results in a 30% reduction in coronary heart disease. Lowering blood pressure by five points can result in a 16% reduction in coronary heart disease and a 42% reduction in strokes.

Additionally, grantees collect data by race, ethnicity, and gender to address health disparities between these populations related to hypertension, diabetes, and obesity.

In a more global sense, PBHCI health indicator data can be used by other behavioral health providers integrating primary care to also demonstrate value for their programs.  For example, the data outlined above meet some of the National Quality Forum-endorsed requirements for performance measurement indicators. Other PBHCI data may meet the Commission on Accreditation for Rehabilitation Facilities

(CARF) standards for behavioral health homes. Lastly, all health data collected by the PBHCI grantees align with two ambitious national initiatives: Million Hearts, a national campaign of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes in the U.S. over 5 years, and Healthy People 2020, a national effort to create healthier communities by 2020. 

Collecting and regularly analyzing health data is pivotal to the success of bidirectional integrated primary and behavioral health programs and contributes to the healthcare professionals’ ability to positively affect the lifespan of adults with serious mental illness.


Grantee Profile: Washtenaw Community Health Organization

Michigan’s Washtenaw Community Health Organization (WCHO) has long placed great value on collaboration with the people it serves. For years, the agency articulated the desire to employ wellness notes in their service delivery process. Recently this vision became reality, thanks to funding through the SAMHSA Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI) program and a separate grant that supported health IT.

WCHO now makes two notable tools available to the people they serve: dashboards and personal health records. The personal health record is a dynamic web portal that shows a person’s current health status, medication information, and future appointments. Dashboards are prepared quarterly and show change over time for disease management engagement, health indicators, and NOMS outcomes. The dashboard is available for an individual or in aggregate. 

Personal health records, conveniently available at waiting room kiosks — and soon available online for remote access — consist of health vitals, medication information, and updates on interventions. WCHO’s electronic medical records (EMR) are configured to produce personal health records, so an individual receiving care or clinician can at-a-glance note the date of the most recent chart updates, clinical documents, current medication instructions, allergies, most recent vitals, wellness goals, and upcoming appointments. In addition to accessing information, those receiving care can send messages to their responsible clinician, update personal information, and change/cancel upcoming appointments.

For those not skilled in computer and internet use, WCHO is preparing to offer peer-led computer classes once the online version launches. These classes will ensure that all those served by the agency have the same access to their health information as clinicians, thereby empowering the individual.

When a new person seeks services from WCHO, clinical staff collect information pertaining to their physical health history, family history, emergency room visits in the past year, and current health symptoms in a personal health review that is updated annually. Clinical staff use this data to both identify those at high-risk and to implement condition-specific interventions based on volume of incoming individuals with specific conditions. Clinicians report increased efficacy in creating work plans using these data collection strategies. For example, an individual who enters services indicating they have diabetes and reports their health status as ‘poor’ or ‘fair’ will be placed in a high-risk category. High-risk individuals are disease managers’ top priority and receive more interventions to address their condition(s). 

WCHO also uses data gained at the consumer and clinical levels as part of their quality improvement process. Of recent note is a study looking at the efficacy of providing disease management and wellness education. The analysis noted, among other things, that individuals who are fully engaged in disease management wellness programs displayed a reduction in body mass index (BMI). In addition to using the results internally to better inform care, WCHO shared the results with the state Department of Community Health and state Medicaid office to demonstrate positive health outcomes and overall health service utilization. Similar organizations statewide have asked WCHO to present their findings onsite.

WCHO has successfully engaged clinicians and the people they serve in innovative ways by exploiting the abilities of their EMR. This has resulted in a more empowering experience for individuals and more information to inform decision-making for the clinicians.

Learn more about Washtenaw and the PBHCI program.


Quick Tips: Collecting and Monitoring Health Data to Improve Outcomes

Collecting health data and using it to inform care is paramount to quality integrated primary and behavioral healthcare integration service delivery. You can use the quick tips below, developed by CIHS Deputy Director Jennifer Crawford, to guide what health data you collect, analyze, and use to improve health outcomes for those you serve.

1. Actively monitor weight and body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, fasting lipids, smoking status, physical activity levels, diet, alcohol and drug use, and medication side effects of all individuals with serious mental illness.

2. With their consent, regularly inform other “need to know” treatment providers about the person’s health status. Explore whether you can participate with your state’s Health Information Exchange (HIE) Direct Messaging program to share a person’s health information between providers using encrypted email.

3. Use motivational interviewing techniques to encourage individuals with mental illnesses and substance use disorders to make positive nutrition, exercise, and smoking changes.

4. Adopt a shared decision-making approach to support each person’s wellness goals and personal empowerment and recovery

5. Refer individuals you serve to peer-led and/or evidence-based wellness programs for adults with serious mental illness. Monitor weight, blood pressure, and smoking upon engagement and then again after 6 months of participation.


Featured Resource

The National Association of Community Health Center devoted its current issue of Community Health Forum magazine to integrating behavioral health and primary care. The issue includes topics such as models for integration, behavioral health screening and intervention in primary care, partnering in the community, the intersection of behavioral health and culture, and the integration of behavioral health services in health homes.  


CIHS Webinars

Did you miss CIHS’ January 18 webinar, “A (Health) Home Run: Operationalizing Behavioral Health Homes?”  Listen to the recording, view the presentation slides, and read the transcription from this webinar, as well as many other CIHS webinars on topics ranging from motivational interviewing to Health Homes to Financing…and much more.


Hot Topics

New Funding Opportunities from NIMH

SBIRT Webinars for Addiction and Health Professionals
The National Association for Addiction Professionals, The ATTC Network, and BIG (Brief Intervention Group) will host a webinar, Addiction Professional's Mini Guide to SBIRT, January 30, 12:00-3:00 pm EST, for addiction professionals to learn more about screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), how it affects the addiction professional, and how they can use it in practice.  On February 27, 12:00-3:00 pm EST, the groups will host a subsequent webinar, Guide to SBIRT: An Introduction to Screening, to introduce health professionals to the use of valid, brief screening tools and how to determine level of intervention based on level of risk.

New SBIRT Website Goes Live
The National SBIRT-ATTC website is up and running. Managed by IRETA, the SBIRT-ATTC website includes a national SBIRT Trainers Registry and much more.

Person-Centered Planning and Collaborative Documentation’s Effect on Treatment Adherence
Psychiatric Services features results of an 11-month program that demonstrated that person-centered planning and collaborative documentation were associated with greater engagement in services and higher rates of medication adherence in community mental health centers.

HRSA’s Telehealth Network Grant Program
The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will award nine grants to rural or urban nonprofits that will provide services through a telehealth network for healthcare providers in rural, frontier, and underserved communities. The program aims to demonstrate how telehealth can improve access to quality healthcare services in these types of communities. HRSA must receive applications by February 13, 2013.

Request for Articles that Embody Recovery Principles
SAMHSA’s Recovery to Practice project seeks articles on recovery from substance abuse and/or co-occurring disorders in an effort to amass resources to help promote and enhance recovery based-practice. The project welcomes vignettes, articles, poems, and personal stories that embody recovery principles. Submit a story and access more resources on recovery.

Primary Care-Behavioral Health Consultation Reduces Depression
An article in the Journal of Health Disparities for Research and Practice shows that integrated behavioral healthcare is associated with reductions in both self-reported levels of depression and the rate of high-cost medical visits. This provides additional support for integrated behavioral health consultative care as an efficacious and cost effective healthcare model.

Comparative Effectiveness of Collaborative Chronic Care Models for Mental Health Conditions across Primary, Specialty, and Behavioral Health Care Settings: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
The American Journal of Psychiatry featured an article demonstrating that collaborative chronic care models can improve mental and physical outcomes for individuals with mental disorders across a wide variety of care settings, and they provide a robust clinical and policy framework for care integration. 

Ten Things You Can Do to Be Recovery Oriented, Starting Today
In a recent article, Recovery to Practice Project Director Dr. Larry Davidson discusses the small changes that behavioral healthcare providers can make to become recovery oriented in their everyday practice


Call Our Helpline: 202.684.7457

eSolutions: Health Indicator Data

Feature Article: Health Data: The Key to Improve Health Outcomes
Grantee Profile:
Washtenaw Community Health Organization
Quick Tips:
Collecting and Monitoring Health Data to Improve Outcomes
Featured Resource
CIHS Webinars
Hot Topics

Health Data: The Key to Improved Health Outcomes

Jennifer Crawford, Deputy Director, JD, LCSW-C, SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions and former PBHCI grant project director

Most professionals working in primary and behavioral health integration know that adults with serious mental illness die earlier than the general population because of chronic health conditions such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular diseases. In addition to early mortality, these adults incur significantly higher healthcare costs. One cost analysis found that average costs were $650 higher per month for individuals with co-occurring behavioral health and chronic health conditions than they were for people without these co-occurring conditions. Most of these illnesses can be managed by actively monitoring clients, as well as educating and encouraging them to make positive lifestyle changes. 

Both behavioral health and primary care providers are increasingly taking up this responsibility, working to address clients’ whole health by developing systems to track health data and demonstrate improved outcomes over time. Since 2009, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has awarded multi-year grants to 93 community behavioral health organizations to integrate primary care into their behavioral health settings. These Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI) grants support systems change and help improve the physical health status of individuals with serious mental illnesses and co-occurring chronic illnesses, as well as support the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ “triple aim” of improving the health outcomes; enhancing the individual’s experience of care — including improving quality, access, and reliability of services; and controlling per capita healthcare cost.

To inform efforts to improve the health status of those they serve, these PBHCI grantees collect health data in intervals of 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The table below summarizes the health data collected by PBHCI grantees.

Data Collected

Frequency of Collection

Rationale

Lipids (Triglycerides, LDL, HDL)
Annually
Monitor cardiovascular risks
Fasting Glucose
Annually
Monitor glucose abnormalities in fasting consumers
 
Evidence suggests that diabetes in people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and schizoaffective disorder is 2-3 times higher than that of the general population. 
HgbA1c
Annually
Monitor glucose abnormalities in non-fasting consumers
 
Fasting glucose can be difficult to obtain.
Height & Weight (yields Body Mass Index(BMI))
Every 3 months
Monitor weight to prevent and address obesity and associated health issues such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
 
People with serious mental Illness have higher rates of obesity and some psychotropic drugs have been documented to cause weight gain. Obesity has been linked to higher rates of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
Waist Circumference
Every 3 months
Monitor weight to prevent and address obesity and associated health issues such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
 
Waist Circumference measurement may be more accurate than BMI to assess for possible cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance.
Breath Carbon Monoxide (CO)
Every 3 months
Monitors CO readings, which correlates to how much a consumer has smoked recently.
Tobacco Use (self-report)
Every 6 months
Monitor tobacco use
 
Evidence suggests that 50-80% of people with major depression, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia smoke and are at significantly higher risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than the general population. Smoking cessation is associated with a roughly 50% decrease in the risk of coronary heart disease.
Blood Pressure (Systolic and Diastolic)
Every 3 months
Monitor or treat hypertension with dietary changes or medication

Behavioral health and primary care professionals apply this health data in a variety of ways. They use it to:

  •  Educate and activate the individuals they serve to stop or taper smoking, increase physical activity, lose weight, reduce and prevent high blood pressure, lower cholesterol, and keep appointments with health providers. 
    Celebrate successes with the individuals they serve.
  • Continuously monitor and address health risks through integrated behavioral health and primary care treatment plans.
  • Coordinate care with primary care providers, therapists, case managers, and psychiatrists.
  • Identify health disparities to inform development of cultural competent services, supports, and information.
  • Create staff- or peer-led wellness programs to address individuals’ complex health needs.
  • Encourage those they serve to participate in wellness activities to reduce a particular health risk. For example, if a person has high blood pressure, staff will encourage him or her to engage in a blood pressure wellness group to learn how to lower their blood pressure. After participation, staff reviews the data again and modifies treatment plans accordingly.
  • Populate analytic tools such as health registries and electronic health record reports. By using registries, behavioral health professionals have been able to shift from focusing only on individual interventions to a population health management approach. Understanding the specific health risks of subsets of individuals by chronic illness or health disparities groups based on race, gender, or age can help providers target limited budgets and staff resources and maximize health outcomes for consumers.

As primary care settings provide more behavioral health services, primary care providers, who have long tracked health outcomes, now also track behavioral health progress.  A frequently used assessment tool in primary care settings is the nine item depression scale called the PHQ-9. This free tool, available in many languages, rates an individual’s level of depression and informs the professional whether the person’s symptoms are responding to treatment. In primary care settings providing “stepped care,” groups of patients are offered medication, brief counseling, and referral to a behavioral health professional or relapse prevention support based on their depression screening scores. Individuals are routinely assessed and monitored to ensure that progress is made. 

Monitoring health data should be a dynamic process that prompts changes in treatment strategies if results are not achieved.  Even small reductions in risk factors can achieve significant reductions in coronary heart diseaseFor example, a 10% reduction in cholesterol levels results in a 30% reduction in coronary heart disease. Lowering blood pressure by five points can result in a 16% reduction in coronary heart disease and a 42% reduction in strokes.

Additionally, grantees collect data by race, ethnicity, and gender to address health disparities between these populations related to hypertension, diabetes, and obesity.

In a more global sense, PBHCI health indicator data can be used by other behavioral health providers integrating primary care to also demonstrate value for their programs.  For example, the data outlined above meet some of the National Quality Forum-endorsed requirements for performance measurement indicators. Other PBHCI data may meet the Commission on Accreditation for Rehabilitation Facilities

(CARF) standards for behavioral health homes. Lastly, all health data collected by the PBHCI grantees align with two ambitious national initiatives: Million Hearts, a national campaign of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes in the U.S. over 5 years, and Healthy People 2020, a national effort to create healthier communities by 2020. 

Collecting and regularly analyzing health data is pivotal to the success of bidirectional integrated primary and behavioral health programs and contributes to the healthcare professionals’ ability to positively affect the lifespan of adults with serious mental illness.


Grantee Profile: Washtenaw Community Health Organization

Michigan’s Washtenaw Community Health Organization (WCHO) has long placed great value on collaboration with the people it serves. For years, the agency articulated the desire to employ wellness notes in their service delivery process. Recently this vision became reality, thanks to funding through the SAMHSA Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration (PBHCI) program and a separate grant that supported health IT.

WCHO now makes two notable tools available to the people they serve: dashboards and personal health records. The personal health record is a dynamic web portal that shows a person’s current health status, medication information, and future appointments. Dashboards are prepared quarterly and show change over time for disease management engagement, health indicators, and NOMS outcomes. The dashboard is available for an individual or in aggregate. 

Personal health records, conveniently available at waiting room kiosks — and soon available online for remote access — consist of health vitals, medication information, and updates on interventions. WCHO’s electronic medical records (EMR) are configured to produce personal health records, so an individual receiving care or clinician can at-a-glance note the date of the most recent chart updates, clinical documents, current medication instructions, allergies, most recent vitals, wellness goals, and upcoming appointments. In addition to accessing information, those receiving care can send messages to their responsible clinician, update personal information, and change/cancel upcoming appointments.

For those not skilled in computer and internet use, WCHO is preparing to offer peer-led computer classes once the online version launches. These classes will ensure that all those served by the agency have the same access to their health information as clinicians, thereby empowering the individual.

When a new person seeks services from WCHO, clinical staff collect information pertaining to their physical health history, family history, emergency room visits in the past year, and current health symptoms in a personal health review that is updated annually. Clinical staff use this data to both identify those at high-risk and to implement condition-specific interventions based on volume of incoming individuals with specific conditions. Clinicians report increased efficacy in creating work plans using these data collection strategies. For example, an individual who enters services indicating they have diabetes and reports their health status as ‘poor’ or ‘fair’ will be placed in a high-risk category. High-risk individuals are disease managers’ top priority and receive more interventions to address their condition(s). 

WCHO also uses data gained at the consumer and clinical levels as part of their quality improvement process. Of recent note is a study looking at the efficacy of providing disease management and wellness education. The analysis noted, among other things, that individuals who are fully engaged in disease management wellness programs displayed a reduction in body mass index (BMI). In addition to using the results internally to better inform care, WCHO shared the results with the state Department of Community Health and state Medicaid office to demonstrate positive health outcomes and overall health service utilization. Similar organizations statewide have asked WCHO to present their findings onsite.

WCHO has successfully engaged clinicians and the people they serve in innovative ways by exploiting the abilities of their EMR. This has resulted in a more empowering experience for individuals and more information to inform decision-making for the clinicians.

Learn more about Washtenaw and the PBHCI program.


Quick Tips: Collecting and Monitoring Health Data to Improve Outcomes

Collecting health data and using it to inform care is paramount to quality integrated primary and behavioral healthcare integration service delivery. You can use the quick tips below, developed by CIHS Deputy Director Jennifer Crawford, to guide what health data you collect, analyze, and use to improve health outcomes for those you serve.

1. Actively monitor weight and body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, fasting lipids, smoking status, physical activity levels, diet, alcohol and drug use, and medication side effects of all individuals with serious mental illness.

2. With their consent, regularly inform other “need to know” treatment providers about the person’s health status. Explore whether you can participate with your state’s Health Information Exchange (HIE) Direct Messaging program to share a person’s health information between providers using encrypted email.

3. Use motivational interviewing techniques to encourage individuals with mental illnesses and substance use disorders to make positive nutrition, exercise, and smoking changes.

4. Adopt a shared decision-making approach to support each person’s wellness goals and personal empowerment and recovery

5. Refer individuals you serve to peer-led and/or evidence-based wellness programs for adults with serious mental illness. Monitor weight, blood pressure, and smoking upon engagement and then again after 6 months of participation.


Featured Resource

The National Association of Community Health Center devoted its current issue of Community Health Forum magazine to integrating behavioral health and primary care. The issue includes topics such as models for integration, behavioral health screening and intervention in primary care, partnering in the community, the intersection of behavioral health and culture, and the integration of behavioral health services in health homes.  


CIHS Webinars

Did you miss CIHS’ January 18 webinar, “A (Health) Home Run: Operationalizing Behavioral Health Homes?”  Listen to the recording, view the presentation slides, and read the transcription from this webinar, as well as many other CIHS webinars on topics ranging from motivational interviewing to Health Homes to Financing…and much more.


Hot Topics

New Funding Opportunities from NIMH

SBIRT Webinars for Addiction and Health Professionals
The National Association for Addiction Professionals, The ATTC Network, and BIG (Brief Intervention Group) will host a webinar, Addiction Professional's Mini Guide to SBIRT, January 30, 12:00-3:00 pm EST, for addiction professionals to learn more about screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), how it affects the addiction professional, and how they can use it in practice.  On February 27, 12:00-3:00 pm EST, the groups will host a subsequent webinar, Guide to SBIRT: An Introduction to Screening, to introduce health professionals to the use of valid, brief screening tools and how to determine level of intervention based on level of risk.

New SBIRT Website Goes Live
The National SBIRT-ATTC website is up and running. Managed by IRETA, the SBIRT-ATTC website includes a national SBIRT Trainers Registry and much more.

Person-Centered Planning and Collaborative Documentation’s Effect on Treatment Adherence
Psychiatric Services features results of an 11-month program that demonstrated that person-centered planning and collaborative documentation were associated with greater engagement in services and higher rates of medication adherence in community mental health centers.

HRSA’s Telehealth Network Grant Program
The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will award nine grants to rural or urban nonprofits that will provide services through a telehealth network for healthcare providers in rural, frontier, and underserved communities. The program aims to demonstrate how telehealth can improve access to quality healthcare services in these types of communities. HRSA must receive applications by February 13, 2013.

Request for Articles that Embody Recovery Principles
SAMHSA’s Recovery to Practice project seeks articles on recovery from substance abuse and/or co-occurring disorders in an effort to amass resources to help promote and enhance recovery based-practice. The project welcomes vignettes, articles, poems, and personal stories that embody recovery principles. Submit a story and access more resources on recovery.

Primary Care-Behavioral Health Consultation Reduces Depression
An article in the Journal of Health Disparities for Research and Practice shows that integrated behavioral healthcare is associated with reductions in both self-reported levels of depression and the rate of high-cost medical visits. This provides additional support for integrated behavioral health consultative care as an efficacious and cost effective healthcare model.

Comparative Effectiveness of Collaborative Chronic Care Models for Mental Health Conditions across Primary, Specialty, and Behavioral Health Care Settings: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
The American Journal of Psychiatry featured an article demonstrating that collaborative chronic care models can improve mental and physical outcomes for individuals with mental disorders across a wide variety of care settings, and they provide a robust clinical and policy framework for care integration. 

Ten Things You Can Do to Be Recovery Oriented, Starting Today
In a recent article, Recovery to Practice Project Director Dr. Larry Davidson discusses the small changes that behavioral healthcare providers can make to become recovery oriented in their everyday practice


© 2011 NCBH, all rights reserved.
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Washington, D.C. 20005

Email: integration@thenationalcouncil.org

Phone: 202-684-7457